Disclaimer: By posting on this web site it is accepted that you have agreed to our Terms. Please DO NOT publish copyrighted material/pictures without the owners permission, you are liable for any costs incurred.

Nochex Donate
Donate Now Target £30, So far £0 (0%)


Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Trusted Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    4,597
    Rep Power
    150

    " Broken heart ".

    At the end of last year U.S. actress Debbie Reynolds died a day after her daughter Carrie Fisher. Many of us are probably aware of bereavement being a risk factor for increased mortality for individuals - often from cardiovascular disease ( heart attacks and strokes ). Years ago an elderly aunt of mine died weeks after the death of her older sister, for whom she had been the main carer.


    Major life events such as bereavement do lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular events - usually short-term. A large study involving UK general practices showed 0.16% of the bereaved group had a heart attack or stroke, compared to 0.08% of the nonbereaved controls, within 30 days of their partner’s death. There was also 25% higher mortality in the first year after partner bereavement in older couples, with a peak in the first 3 months.


    The absolute contribution of bereavement to overall cardiovascular events is small. It may be an unrepeated event for each individual. There are a variety of possible factors involved, such as short-term changes in blood pressure, heart rate, blood clotting, and chemicals such as cortisol and adrenaline. During the period around the death of a loved one, individuals may neglect their own health needs. Longer-term changes in lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption, may also eventually contribute.


    There is an uncommon medical condition sometimes called " broken heart syndrome ", originally recognised in Japan over 25 years ago. It’s known as " stress cardiomyopathy ", or more exotically as " takotsubo/octopus pot cardiomyopathy ". The cardiomyopathies are - literally - conditions with diseased heart muscle, often inherited, not due to coronary artery disease.


    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is acquired, with symptoms like a heart attack, but with no blockage of coronary arteries. It’s commoner in women, and especially occurs following emotional or physical stress such as bereavement. Many people do recover. It’s thought that raised " stress hormones ", such as adrenaline, " stun " the heart, which becomes " ballooned " through failure, and resembles a takotsubo - a pot used by Japanese fishermen to trap octopuses.


    This shows - on the left - the heart in a patient with takotsubo, and - right - a ceramic pot used to trap an octopus.





    Cardiovascular disease, especially coronary artery disease causing angina and heart attacks, is unfortunately still too common in the U.K., Philippines, and worldwide. Remember there are well known risk factors, numerically more important than the cause(s) of " broken heart ". These may either be " fixed ", such as age and male sex ; or potentially changeable, such as smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, lack of exercise / obesity, alcohol excess, and high blood lipid levels .



  2. #2
    Moderator Arthur Little's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    City of Perth, Scotland
    Posts
    23,730
    Rep Power
    150
    I can well~believe Debbie Reynolds actually died of a "broken heart"/extreme distress on learning of her daughter's passing ... as losing one's child (regardless of that "child's" age) must surely be the saddest, most tragic occurrence for ANY normal parent to bear.

    Likewise, Alan ... it doesn't surprise me to read of the death of your elderly aunt so soon after that of the sister for whom she herself had cared so devotedly. Alas, this is all too common among older people.

    Having lost BOTH my own parents to heart attacks - my dad just after New Year, 1989 at 76 and my mum, two days after Christmas 2000 at 84 - those were sorrowful enough occasions. But, at least each of them died suddenly and peacefully, following relatively long, active lifespans ... free, for the most part, from serious illnesses, for which my brother Douglas and myself can be thankful.


  3. #3
    Trusted Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    4,597
    Rep Power
    150
    Thank you for your thoughtful response, Arthur


  4. #4
    Trusted Member Rosie1958's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,495
    Rep Power
    150
    Another interesting read Alan, thank you!


  5. -

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Scientists Start To Examine "Fiddled" Global Warming Figures
    By Arthur Little in forum News - World
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 5th December 2015, 23:38
  2. Spam emails Subject "Test mesage then 6 digits and a letter"
    By Dedworth in forum Loose Talk, Chat and Off Topic
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15th November 2014, 19:04
  3. "Not in the public interest" to publish aborted unwanted girls data
    By Dedworth in forum Loose Talk, Chat and Off Topic
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 9th March 2013, 01:01
  4. APPLICATION FORM "How to" "What to"
    By brokenpieces in forum Help & Advice
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 13th April 2012, 23:39
  5. Home Office announce "new" controls to protect British jobs
    By Pepe n Pilar in forum UK Employment
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 22nd September 2009, 21:49

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Filipino Forum : Philippine Forum